It’s That Time of Year

IMG_1799

Downy Woodpecker

It is the time of year when birding on the Island slows down. It seems that most of the birds that we are all looking for have left the province – warblers, song birds and shorebirds. But there are other birds that are here these days garnering our attention. We have had reports of Snowy Owls, Snow Buntings and Bohemian Waxwings. Finches that normally would be found much further north are in the province now. As well, we are getting reports of birds that are not typically found in the province. Recently we have heard of Red-bellied Woodpeckers, a couple of Northern Cardinals, a Field Sparrow and a Pine Warbler. Who knows what we might add to our Winter Bird list.

IMG_1830

Dark-eyed Junco

IMG_1822

Red Squirrel – Always a feeder attendant.

IMG_1844

American Crow

IMG_1848

Snow Angel – Created by visiting birds.

Keeping most of us active are those birds that are coming to our feeders. We are seeing some of the regulars, like Blue Jays, American Crows, Dark-eyed Juncos and Black-capped Chickadees. Finches are adding to the interest and providing some colour. Those include American Goldfinch, Common Redpolls and the feisty little Pine Siskins.

IMG_1944

American Goldfinch – Male showing the beginning of the spring molt, brighter yellow and the start of the black cap.

IMG_2043

Common Redpoll and Pine Siskin

Of course, it is always worthwhile to check our areas of open water for waterfowl. These days it is likely we will see Common Goldeneye, Common Merganser and Greater Scaup but with luck, who knows, you might find Barrow’s Goldeneye, Harlequin Ducks or Purple Sandpiper.

IMG_1921

Mallard

 

IMG_2045

Common Goldeneye and Common Merganser

To keep people interested, we are trying to keep our Winter Bird List up to date. As well we are creating events such Winter Feeder tour of Charlottetown and Area and participating in the Winter Woodlot Tour 2015.

https://www.facebook.com/WheatleyRiverImprovementGroup

https://www.facebook.com/events/398510193651073/

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This entry was posted in Bird Canada. Bookmark the permalink.

Comments are closed.