Spring arrivals continued

It seems like every time I get out birding this month, there are a couple new species that have arrived in my area (Woodstock, NB). Just last week I found 75 different species! I’m up to 135 for the year and need just another 30 to beat my record for what I’ve found over the course of a year in New Brunswick.

Here is what I’ve been seeing around Carleton County;

Black-throated Green Warbler

Black-throated Green Warbler

Brant

Brant (lifer) – it stayed around for a week. It is very common to see this species around here so it was great that I didn’t have to go to northern or southern NB to find one.

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Blue-headed Vireo

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Blackburnian Warbler – usually this species is up high in the trees so it was nice to see this one up close and low enough to get a photo!

Rose-breasted Grosbeak

Rose-breasted Grosbeak (female) – I’ve had the male and female in my yard for over a week now

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Northern Parula – a very easy warbler to find around right now. Ovenbirds are too, but they are much harder to photograph!

 

Rarities for May – New Brunswick

Yellow-crowned Night Heron – https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=1099521693408252&set=pcb.850021688426143&type=1&relevant_count=3

Sandhill Crane – https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10153227527281280&set=gm.846927025402276&type=1

Orchard Oriole – https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=708390112536640&set=pcb.643639829064331&type=1&theater

Blue Grosbreak – http://birdingnewbrunswick.ca/forum/topics/beautiful-blue-grosbeak-may-13-2015

Yellow-throated Warbler – http://birdingnewbrunswick.ca/forum/topics/yellow-throated-warbler

Glossy Ibis – http://birdingnewbrunswick.ca/forum/topics/glossy-ibis-sackville-waterfowl-park

 

Until next time,

Nathan Staples

http://natethebirder.blogspot.com/

About Nathan Staples

I am a public school teacher who has always lived in New Brunswick. My wife and I have three boys who love to watch birds nearly as much as I do. We currently live in the province’s oldest town, Woodstock.

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