New Online Manitoba Species At Risk Website

As part of Bird Studies Canada’s ongoing efforts to inform people about Species at Risk (SAR), the Manitoba Breeding Bird Atlas has just launched a new online Manitoba SAR Guide. This website provides detailed Manitoba-specific information on all avian SAR that breed in the province, with numerous habitat photos, descriptions, and other relevant details.

The site was built by University of Winnipeg student Richard Stecenko, as part of a practicum for a rhetoric course, with material provided by atlas staff and volunteers. Richard went over and above the call of duty in designing the site, and demonstrated another way of becoming involved in BSC’s regional programs. This site will augment the significant contributions of data relating to SAR that atlas volunteers have already made.

As a birder-blogger-internet marketer who does not live in Manitoba, I am totally green with envy. Richard has designed a phenomenal website for endangered birds in that province which must have taken him several hundred hours. What a great country it would be if every province had a similar site for their own SAR birds!

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2 Responses to New Online Manitoba Species At Risk Website

  1. Pat Bumstead says:

    Thanks for letting me know – the link is now fixed to the Manitoba SAR Guide. The National Geographic Field Guide to Birds of North America has separate pages for ducks, shorebirds and hawks in flight. Other bird guides show birds in flight for each species listing, but you would have to know which species to look up first.

  2. Marissa says:

    Manitoba SAR guide link is not working. Please advise.
    I moved into the Steinbach Winnipeg region and see a lot of birds that I would love to know the names of and would be happy to report. I am also a pilot and love to see birds in flight off my wing tips.
    What book(s) can you recommend to me please, especially the books that include the image of what the book looks like in flight.
    Thanks,
    Marissa