Early Autumn on the Prairies

While it’s still summer in Alberta, many areas in the province experienced snow yesterday (Monday). In our area, it snowed for just a short while, but then the melted away as the temperature reached a high of 5 degrees C.

Here are some photos from the past few weeks, of early autumn on the prairies. In this part of the country, we don’t go by the calendar, so just because the autumn equinox is several weeks away doesn’t mean it’s still summer. Day length is dramatically shorter already, nights are cooler, leaves are turning, and the sky is filled with the sounds and sight of migrating birds. As I write this, I can hear the Snow Buntings, Canada Geese, Sandhill Cranes, and American Pipits flying overhead.

Here’s a photo of a Swainson’s Hawk sitting on some of the small square alfalfa hay bales we made earlier this month,

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Watching for mice,

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Sandhill Cranes,

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A bit closer,

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A Yellow-rumped Warbler,

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A Black-capped Chickadee,

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About Charlotte Wasylik

Charlotte Wasylik is a young birder who lives on a farm in northeastern Alberta. She was delighted to be selected for a monthlong Young Ornithologists’ Internship at the Long Point Bird Observatory in Ontario in August-September, to help with fall migration monitoring. Charlotte’s blog is Prairie Birder, and you can also find her at the Facebook group she started last year, Alberta Birds, which welcomes all birders, bird lovers, and nature photographers.
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4 Responses to Early Autumn on the Prairies

  1. Thanks Josiah! Yes, it was very hot last week and now it’s the start of winter — crazy, right!

  2. Great work, Jim! Really like the Chickadee … Keep it up!

  3. Great pictures! I heard the Alberta area got snow. Our friends who live there say they got sunburn a couple days before, then they had there ski-doos out.

  4. Pingback: New Bird Canada Blog Post | Prairie Birder