Here Comes Fall

September brought us into the middle of shorebird movement through Prince Edward Island. Shorebirds have been moving through on their southward migration for a while now and we were eager to get on with it by participating in a brand new, world-wide event called World Shorebirds’ Day. The actual event took place on September 6, with an option to do it on the 7th. We chose Sunday, September 7 with the hope of attracting additional birders. We stared our day at Locke Shore on Malpeque Bay. The tide was high and did not allow us to explore the area as much as we would have liked but did allow for some interesting sightings among which were Semipalmated Sandpipers as well as some accommodating Nelson’s Sparrows.

Semi palmated Sandpiper

Semi palmated Sandpiper

Nelson's Sparrow

Nelson’s Sparrow

From Locke Shore, we moved to the dock in Summerside we were able to locate a nice pair of Ruddy Turnstones as well as numerous gulls and a lonely White-winged Scoter.

One of two Ruddy Turnstones seen in Summerside.

One of two Ruddy Turnstones seen in Summerside.

Afternoon found us in Carleton Cove, where we were able to pick up our first highlight of the day; 19 Red Knots among Semipalmated Sandpiper, Semipalmated and Black-bellied Plover and both Lesser and Greater Yellowlegs.

One of the nineteen Red Knot seen in Carleton Cove

One of the nineteen Red Knot seen in Carleton Cove

Another highlight of the day was a Red-necked Phalarope located in the Borden Lagoons. This bird is not common on PEI and had been reported previously as having been see recently on the PEI listserve.

Red-necked phalarope

Red-necked phalarope

The month ended with the Bennett Birding Classic. The Classic is a fundraising event for the Island Nature trust. Four teams took part by exploring the Island from early morning to late in the evening in a challenge to find the most birds in 24 hours. Funds are raised by sponsorship or donation base on the number of birds counted as an option. One team was able to list total of 102 species, including: 2 Peregrine Falcons and a Cackling Goose! Another team was able to locate Sandhill Cranes, another unusual visitor to PEI.

Greater Yellowlegs counted in Noonan's Marsh during the Bennett

Greater Yellowlegs counted in Noonan’s Marsh during the Bennett

Great Cormorant counted at Orby Head during the Bennett

Great Cormorant counted at Orby Head during the Bennet

Overall it has been a fine month of birding on Prince Edward Island and we are looking forward to what October brings!

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