Category Archives: Bird Behaviour

Summer Songs

We wait for it the minute it’s gone. Summer. Long, languid days followed by starry nights staring at the bonfire. Full moons. Crashing thunderstorms followed by placating rainbows.These are the songs of summer. We hum them in our minds all … Continue reading

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Ovenbirds Flipping Out

Stop and think of the most easily distinguished and most monotonous songsters in the Canadian woods during the breeding season. “Teacher – Teacher – Teacher – Teacher – Teacher!” Although Ovenbirds are familiar and welcome singers, they seem to be … Continue reading

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Mergansers and their un-Common Mothers.

As an avid birder, the depth and scope of my little “hobby” has deepened and widened over the years, and I also  accumulated a few dozen or maybe several dozen bird carvings, bird paintings, bird clothing (especially fond of socks),binoculars, … Continue reading

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Mimicry at its finest

I’m sure many of you have heard tales of Mockingbirds being true to their names and imitating various other birds, animals, machines and almost any noise. Mockingbirds are notorious for copying other birds songs and adding them to a repertoire … Continue reading

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Lighthouse Park (West Vancouver, BC): Photo Essay

My monthly post for Bird Canada will not feature any photos of birds (although I will have a few shots that show the result of bird activity, as you will see at the end), but will feature many pictures taken … Continue reading

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How Many Maritimers Does it Take to Find a Downy Woodpecker False Face?

The idea that “false faces” are used by birds for predator deterrence floats in the ether between biology textbook case study and mythical meme. The idea that evolution can produce false faces compels and amazes us but because of the lack of … Continue reading

Posted in Animals, Bird Behaviour, Bird Canada, Bird Identification, Canadian Birds, Nature Photography, Songbirds, Woodpeckers | Tagged , , , , , , | 4 Comments

Don’t Touch That Baby Bird!

Posted by Charlotte Wasylik, aka Prairie Birder The other week, I had a question from one of my readers asking what to do with a baby American Robin his family had found and what to feed it. At once I … Continue reading

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The Hazards of Nestcamming

A few weeks ago a fellow Gabriola birder confided that some days he wished he didn’t have a nest cam. At first I assumed he was referring to the amount of time he spends watching the screen. (I could relate … Continue reading

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Finding Wilderness in Toronto

I marvel how much I learn from birds. I do not exaggerate when I say that they have taught me how to see, how to pay attention to detail, and how to appreciate the unexpected finds even when the sought … Continue reading

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Sharp-tailed Dancers

Outstanding video from the Alberta Conservation Association! The sharp-tailed grouse is a native game bird that makes its home in the prairies, parklands and forest openings of Alberta. For much of the year the sharp-tailed grouse is a quiet, well-camouflaged … Continue reading

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