Author Archives: Greg Byron

About Greg Byron

Greg Byron, orginally from Montreal, now resides in the South Okanagan Valley of British Columbia, Canada's only desert. He operates an Ecotourism business, Great Horned Owl Eco Tours, www.okanaganecotours.com and focusses on bird watching and nature adventure tours. In order to deliver unique and experiential tours greg has have become very driven to understand all of the plants and animals which reside in the Okanagan along with Natural History, geology and issues surrounding water sustainability and climate change. Another gem about the Okanagan that isn't too well known is bird watching; with over 300 species the Okanagan is one of the premiere bird watching areas in all of Canada. As an avid birdwatcher, when guests go on his bird watching tour one of his goals is to find for them a "Life Bird". In Greg's backyard can be found 10% of Canada's endangered species including: Williamson's Sapsuckers, Lark Sparrows, White Headed Woodpeckers, Yellow Breasted Chats and Western Screech Owls. Check out my photostream on Flickr

Discoveries made on the Lewis and Clark Expedition

  As I begin to accumulate knowledge about the South Okanagan, it is astounding to find out how many plants and animals were identified and named for the explorer’s Meriwether Lewis and William Clark. The expedition was ordered by the … Continue reading

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Feeding Birds during the Winter

  Feeding and watching birds have become favorite pastimes in North America. It is estimated that 1/3 of the population feeds wild birds. This ranges from putting out scraps of food to serving seed, suet and nuts. During the winter … Continue reading

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What makes an owl a top predator?

  Many birders, me included, have an affinity for owls (families Tytonidae and Strigidae). They bring a certain fascination, mystique and inspiration that compel many people to seek out these raptors when in the field. Throughout the world there are … Continue reading

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Killer Cats on the Loose

  Some alarming statistics have recently been reported concerning the number of birds killed by cats in both Canada and the United States. According to a study by Avian Conservation Ecology (2013) between 100 million and 350 million birds are … Continue reading

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How to Distinguish a Sharp-Shined from a Cooper’s Hawk

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While out looking for a Williamsons’s Sapsucker

In late March of 2013 we set off to find the Williamson’s Sapsucker, in an area where it is known to return to year after year. These cavity nesters use dead or dying large stags (usually Ponderosa Pine) and are … Continue reading

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Eurasian Collared Dove

  In early October 2011 was the first time that a Eurasian Collared Dove had visited my bird feeder, I quickly grabbed my camera and took some pictures. Previously I have seen this bird and it was added to my … Continue reading

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Evaluation of Audubon’s Cell Phone App

  Last summer I was looking for a birding App to add to my cell phone and opted for Audubon Birds. Originally I was considering “Sibley eGuide to Birds”, but after reading some product reviews went with “The Online Guide … Continue reading

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Take Your Birding Expereince to New Levels

I have been pursuing my passion for bird watching for the past 15 years and must say that it has given me countless hours of satisfaction and excitement.  In the birding world we recently had both the book “The Big … Continue reading

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An Owl with eyes in the back of its head

One of the more diminutive members of the Owl family is the Northern Pygmy Owl (Glaucidium gnona) which is 6”-61/2” (15-17 cm) in size. These pictures were taken on January 8th, 2009 the second picture shows that it has “Eyes … Continue reading

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